An Open Letter To My CEO: The Message Yelp Needed To Hear

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If it doesn’t come as a shocker to you now, it will when you decide to apply for jobs in an unaffordable city. Talia Jane, a former customer service representative for the empire like monopoly published an open letter to the CEO, Jeremy Stoppelman, on Medium Feb. 19th. You may want to sit down for this.

“On Friday night, Talia Jane, an employee at the customer support section of Yelp and the delivery site Eat24, published an essay on Medium explaining how little she was paid, and how she couldn’t afford to buy groceries or heat her apartment on her $8.15 an hour salary.

Jane recounted her firing in a message to Gawker: “I found out before my manager did. About two hours after I posted the letter, my phone vibrated but didn’t have a notification—my mailbox does this sometimes, I don’t know why, so I checked my inbox for all my linked email accounts…That’s when I knew, because they terminate all your access to the system before you come into work. So I called my manager and told him I got fired. He didn’t know what I was talking about and said he’d call me back after he looked into it. He called me back a few minutes later and told me someone from HR was there with him.”” - GAWKER

Our main question is this: In a city where the minimum wage is $12.25 an hour - how does a monopoly such as YELP squeeze by the SF Labor Union and allow an $8.15 pay rate? Stoppelman responded to Jane’s open letter via Twitter.

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Stoppelman also added, “Two sides to every HR story so Twitter army please put down the pitchforks.“ It’s a very un-ceo like comment to make but of course, Twitter had much to say about the issue.

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Reported on Gawker, “Interestingly enough, while Stoppelman found the time to bemoan the high cost of living in San Francisco, he didn’t touch upon the fact that his company won’t pay its employees enough to live there.“

Yelp has been under constant fire for messing with businesses’ reviews if they did not pay the upgrade fee for their premium service. An extensive documentary called, “Billion Dollar Bully” went undercover on the practices Yelp uses to administrate on their platform.

Kris Gellci, a commenter on Janes’ open letter had an interesting point to make:

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TLDR: You didn’t mention all of the details that surround your life. You didn’t think this through.

Thoughts on this letter to Yelp? Do you use the service or hate their guts? Let us know via Twitter. Do you think Talia Jane is in the right or did she overstep her means?

Sources pulled from Gawker, Medium, Stoppelman’s Twitter, and The Bold Italic. Images sourced from The Bold Italic and Stoppelman’s Twitter. Corrections for this article can be submitted here.

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