Crookedest Road No More, It’s Time To Pay Up

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And before you use the “Oh I live here” trick, SF officials are considering purchased tickets to drive crooked part of Lombard street. Oh man.

San Francisco’s “infamous” Crookedest Road has been the problem for not only the people living on this particular portion of the street but also the tourists who travel in packs to see it. If you’ve ever wanted to drive your family down the street, you know that waiting 15 or so minutes is expected. And for only a, possibly, 3 minute drive down — it’s not worth it (in some cases).

City officials are considering a basket of measures — including requiring those who wish to drive the street’s meandering curves purchase a ticket in advance — to reduce traffic on the block. Which sounds smart no?

Studied by the San Francisco County Transportation Authority, this could be a move to not only limit the blockage in line congestion but could be fiscally appealing to better our transportation in general. Other options, which were presented at a community yesterday, include charging a toll, having “parking control officers and ambassadors” onsite to wrangle crowds, and closing the block altogether to nonresident drivers. But don’t worry just yet, these have yet to be decided.

To those who live on this part of the street (Yes, real people do live in these homes), ”It didn’t used to be this way, but the city allowed this to happen,” Greg Brundage, who lives on the block in question, told the Chronicle. “This used to be one of the prime neighborhoods of the city — and still is, in some ways — but we’re invaded daily.”

Brundage, who’s lived there twenty years, describes having to chase two strangers off his roof with a golf club recently.

“It really has taken a lot of the joy out of living here,” he added.

If you remember back in June of 2014, the city enacted a pilot “car-free” weekend from the crooked street and that fueled a pedestrian nightmare. “I think this pilot program is a joke…I mean look at this,” Fran Bak told CBS. So the city has a tough decision to make after not disciplining the problem for years upon years.

But to keep into perspective, this particular part of town has a Vision Zero safety concern. Basically meaning that due to slow speeds and constant congestion, crashes are 1 in few and most minor collisions are immediately reported by neighbors and the tourists who hike up and down to get the perfect view.

We are not sure if this this will be brought up on the November ballot but we wouldn’t be surprised if we saw it.


Written by Anthony Rogers, photo sourced from NBC Bay Area — What are your thoughts? It’s definitely worth something to talk about, no? Also, while you’re at it, subscribe to our newsletter because you know you want too.